Could you have Pyrroluria disorder_

Pyrrole disorder could be affecting your mental health 

Many of my clients that have been diagnosed with anxiety, depression or mental health problems. The road to recovery is never easy and can involve many different treatment options. Typically the first line treatment for these conditions is medication and/or therapy. While both these methods have shown success in the past, many in the Naturopathic and Integrative professionals are looking for a nutritional biochemical cause.  One of those factors contributing to mental illness is disorder that approximately 10% of the population suffers from. 

What disorder am I referring to? 

Pyrrole disorder

While we have known about Pyrrole disorder (or mauve factor) for some time, treatment and testing for this disorder is quite rare for the medical field. There are numerous reasons for this, some being cultural and others being economical (for example there is currently no pharmaceutical drugs for it). Naturopaths and integrative physicians though, are more likely to look into this disorder. Diagnosis and treatment of this disorder is simple has turned many patients lives around. 

Biochemistry 

Pyrroles, or krytpopyrroles are involved in hame production and serve no physiological function beyond this. Pyrrole disorder is diagnosed when there are elevated levels of Pyrroles found within the urine. After contributing to hame production, Pyrroles bind to vitamin B6, Zinc and are taken away via the kidneys. Fatty acids (fish oil among others) magnesium and other nutrients are also affected by pyrroles. These key nutrients have a major impact on conditions such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, ADHA and substance abuse.

The cause

The cause of this disorder is often epigenetic, meaning that the expression of genes are also effected by environmental and nutritional factors. Many patients go undiagnosed for decades and that is may be the reason why  many psychiatric medicines such as anti-depressants can have little to no effect. Regarding this, anti-depressants may only have full effect in 30% of cases, with 30% having slight improvement and another 30% having no symptom relief whatsoever.  Nutritional factors, such as Pyrrole, often play a major role and the relevance of nutrition and psychiatry is yet to completely take hold in the medical mainstream. 

Could you have Pyrrole disorder?

Symptoms of Pyrole include but are not limited to:

Moodiness

Anxiety

Acne

Lower back pain

Irritability

Alcoholism and other addictions

Fatigue

Abdominal pain

Allergies

Motion sickness

Insomnia

Skin rashes

Reading difficulties

Migraines

Low libido

Diagnosis

Diagnosis is made via a simple urine test requested up by a qualified practitioner. The results are then sent to the practitioner and discussed with the patient. 

Treatment

Treatment is made via high does supplementation with P5P (activated B6), Zinc, Magnesium, and other nutrients. These are dosed and prescribed under clinical supervision to ensure the best result.

Outcome

Symptom relief can take weeks or months and depends on the elevation of Pyrroles. People often find that their mood lifts, they are less fatigued and their overall wellbeing improves.

Conclusion

As you can see, Pyrroles is a relevantly unheard of disorder, however it can, in part, contribute to mental illness. If this is something you would like to consider for yourself and would like to test for Pyrroles, click here to enquire. 

Final:

By Jeremy Brown

Naturopath

(Adv. Dip. Nat., TAE IV, MNHAA)

Mental health in its complexity 

Many of my clients have been diagnosed with anxiety, depression and mental illness in some form. The road to recovery is never easy and can involve many different treatment options. Typically the first line of treatment for these conditions is medication and/or therapy. While both these methods have shown success in the past, many in the Naturopathic and Integrative professions are looking for a nutritional biochemical cause.  One of those factors is a disorder that approximately 10% of the population suffers from yet may not even know it.

What disorder am I referring to?

Pyrrole disorder 

While we have known about Pyrrole disorder (or Mauve factor) for some time, treatment and testing for this disorder is quite rare for the Medical field. There are numerous reasons for this, some being cultural and others being economical (for example there is currently no pharmaceutical drug for it). Naturopaths and Integrative physicians are more likely to look into Pyrrole disorder however. Diagnosis and treatment is simple and has turned many patient’s lives around.

While unheard of in some professions, Pyrrole disorder is quite relevant in mental health

Biochemistry

Pyrroles, or krytpopyrroles are involved in heme production and serve no physiological function beyond this. Pyrrole disorder is diagnosed when there are elevated levels of Pyrroles found within the urine. After contributing to heme production, Pyrroles bind to vitamin B6, zinc and are then taken away via the kidneys. Fatty acids (fish oil among others) magnesium and other nutrients are also affected by Pyrroles. These key nutrients have a major impact on conditions such as depression, anxiety, schizophrenia, ADHD and substance abuse.

Pyrrole disorder affect key nutrients involved in mental health 

Related: Can Naturopathy help with mental health?

The cause

The cause of this disorder is often epigenetic, meaning that the expression of genes are affected by environmental and nutritional factors. Many patients go undiagnosed for decades and that may be one of the reasons why many psychiatric medicines such as anti-depressants may have little to no effect. Regarding this, anti-depressants typically only have full effect in 30% of cases, with 30% having slight improvement and a further 30% having no symptom relief whatsoever. This is not to say that they are without value. Looking at matters more holistically, nutritional factors, such as Pyrroles, often play a major role. The relevance of nutrition within psychiatry is yet to completely take hold in the Medical mainstream, though this is slowly changing.

Genes, nutrition and environment all play a role in Pyrrole disorder

Related: Five natural ways to beat the blues

Symptoms of Pyrrole

These include but are not limited to:

Moodiness

Anxiety

Acne

Lower back pain

Irritability

Alcoholism and other addictions

Fatigue

Abdominal pain

Allergies

Motion sickness

Insomnia

Skin rashes

Reading difficulties

Migraines

Low libido

        White spts on the nails 

Diagnosis and treatment

Diagnosis is made via a simple urine test requested up by a practitioner. The results are then sent to the practitioner and discussed with the patient.  Treatment is made via high dose supplementation with P5P (activated B6), zinc, magnesium, and other nutrients. These are dosed and prescribed under supervision to ensure the best result. 

Diagnosis and treatment are quite simple and effective for Pyrroles

Outcome

Symptom relief can take weeks or months and depends on the elevation of Pyrroles. People often find that their mood lifts, they are less fatigued and their overall wellbeing improves. So as you can see, that though Pyrroles is a relevantly unheard of disorder it can certainly contribute to mental health. The treatment is both simple and effective once a diagnosis has been made.

If you would like to test yourself for Pyrroles, click here to find out more

Yours in health,

Jeremy Brown

| Naturopath | Educator | Writer | 

Supporting Evidence: 

Hechtman, L. (2012). Clinical Naturopathic medicine. Sydney, Australia: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier Australia.

 *Please note that this advice is of a general nature and does not replace the instruction of your health care practitioner.

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