Extremes in Nutrition

Having the honor of lecturing in nutrition, I can feel the responsibility of moving my students in the right direction. Thankfully, I am teaching principles in Naturopathic Nutrition and really, it is a position where I engage already brilliant minds down a path they already understand. Though I am not teaching the clinical subjects, do I have anything to say on nutrition?

Well, yes and no.

What I believe.

I believe with the right knowledge anyone can eat well within his or her circumstances. The food does not have to be from the far plains of Africa and does need to cost $85.00/kg, be only organic and picked by virgins under the moonlight. Sound familiar? Sounds like marketing really.

What Matters

To me its simple, apply the research to what you already know, and the rest will follow. Read on to find out more.

What’s hip, and what’s not

There are many fads in nutrition. Usually they focus on two things: completely removing one food product or group (IE: I quit sugar) or adding strange expensive foods from far away places. I believe it does not have to be either or and I believe that you can have your cake (excuse the pun) and eat it too. Yes, we can reduce (not cut out completely) and yes we can add (if you only eat spirulina, what would happen to your fibre intake?) 

The bottom line

After years of formal study, clinical practice and study you can boil it all down to one thing: eat a plant based diet with many different colors and keep the servings smaller in size.

Too good to be true?

Simple really, you don’t need a program, a magazine or a celebrity to sell it. All you need is real whole food. And surprise, surprise, it may be best organic, but you will not melt you don’t eat only organic (true story). 

Why though?

One thing I have learnt was that a plant based diet is best. By plant based, I don’t mean eating only potato chips till early in the morning diet. I simply mean whole vegetable food. Colors; red, green, orange and all in between. Yes, you can have meat, but really, you can get your protein, iron and nutrients from plant based food. Just be clever about it. Put some work in. Believe me: you can.

But can’t I just use supplements?

Not just from supplements, but they are there if you need them. 

Are you vegetarian Jeremy?

Do I eat meat? I don’t believe it would matter if I did. What matters is; I don’t make the standard: tradition and science does. And these speak of a vegetable rich, high fibre and whole protein diet. Simple really. 

Break it down.

It seems that sometimes the simplest things are often the most challenging, and also sometimes even the cheapest. They just take work. Nothing will replace real cooking , real food and the joy of cooking.

Embrace it, because you may even find enjoyment, health and wholiness.

That’s what I tell my students.

Thank you. 

Final:

By Jeremy Brown

Naturopath & Lecturer

Advanced Diploma of Naturopathy

Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

Having the honour of lecturing in Naturopathic Nutrition, I know the responsibility of moving my students in the right direction. Thankfully, I am teaching principles in Nutrition and really, I am in the position where I engage already brilliant minds down a path they already understand. Though I am not teaching the clinical subjects, I do have something to say on Nutrition.

What I believe

I believe with the right knowledge anyone can eat well within his or her circumstances. The food does not have to be from the far plains of Africa and does need to cost $85.00/kg, be organic and picked by virgins under the moonlight.

Sound familiar?

Sounds like marketing really.

I should know, I own a business.

What Matters

To me its simple; apply the research to what you already know, and the rest will follow.

Read on to find out more.

What’s trendy, and what’s not

There are many fads in nutrition. Usually they focus on two things: completely removing one food product or group (e.g.: I quit sugar) or adding excessive amounts of strange expensive foods (e.g.: super foods).

I believe it does not have to be either or and I also believe that you can have your cake (excuse the pun) and eat it too.

Yes, we can reduce (and there is a time to cut out) and yes we can add (but if you only eat spirulina, what would happen?)

Basically: its about balance.

How I got here

After years of formal study, clinical practice and lecturing, you can boil it all down to one thing:

Eat a plant based diet with whole protein build around many different colours.

But be patient and kind to yourself with healthy eating. 

Read on for details. 

Why though?

Because its simple really and you don’t need a program, a magazine or blog to sell it. All you need is real whole food. And though it may be best organic, but you will not melt you don’t eat organic (true story).

Why plant based whole food?

One thing I have learnt is that a plant based diet is ideal. By plant based, I don’t mean eating only potato chips till early in the morning diet. I simply mean whole vegetable food. Colors; red, green, orange and all in between. Yes, you can have meat, but really, you can get your protein, Iron and nutrients from plant based food.

Though I believe you understand this already.

Can’t I just use supplements?

Funny coming from a Naturopath, but its not all about supplements, though they are there if you need them.

Are you vegetarian Jeremy?

Do I eat meat? I don’t believe it would matter if I was. What matters is, I don’t make the standard, tradition and science does. Even though people read this information differently, and they do.

But generally, they speak of a vegetable rich, high fibre and whole protein diet.

People are vegetarian for a variety of reasons. Ethical, religious or otherwise.

And I respect those.

To answer your question

Yes, I eat and love quality meat. Because its tasty.

I don’t always get it right, but no one does.

And thats my point.

The problem that comes up

The problem that we can come across with Nutrition is some, but not all, moralise and judge others based on their choices. I believe in guiding my patients so that they can be empowered to make their own educated decisions.

Nutrition can change lives. However, it takes patience and often holding back on your judgements.

So be kind to yourself and others when it comes to heathly eating.

Admittedly, I find that hard at times too.

Though I’m getting there.

The simple things

It seems that sometimes the simplest things in Nutrition are often the most challenging, and sometimes the cheapest. They just take work. Nothing will replace real cooking, real food and the joy of cooking.

Cooking should be fun.

In closing

Embrace it, because its possible that it may lead to enjoyment, health and wholiness.

As I mentioned, be patient with yourself and others choices, even if you don’t agree with them.

Don’t judge yourself or anyone to harshly. 

That’s what I tell my students – and thats what I tell myself.

Thank you!

This advice is of a general nature, if you are require detailed clinical advice on Nutrition, visit our website below.

Yours in health,

Jeremy Brown

Naturopathic practitioner and Principal at Brown’s Wellbeing Centre.

www.brownswellbeingcentre.com.au

www.facebook.com/brownswellbeingcentre

www.twitter.com/jbrown_nat

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