Mg

Muscle cramps? Migraines? Low on energy or needing to regulate blood sugar? 

You may require Magnesium.

Remedy of the month: Magnesium

Part of this Blog is to showcase a new remedy each month, some months will have vitamins or minerals, other months Herbal Medicines. Today, we will be looking at Magnesium.

The mineral Magnesium (or Mg) is the fourth most abundant cation in the body and it has many important functions within your body. It is involved in over 300 essential enzymatic reactions and is necessary for every major bodily process. Enzymes are proteins within your body that change one chemical to another, and Magnesium is a major player in many of them. The spoke in the wheel that helps the car to move is one way to put it. Magnesium is also extremely important for other fundamental minerals including Calcium, Potassium, and sodium to name a few.

So Magnesium is vital for everyday bodily function and wellbeing. 

But what of specific clinical applications? Just what does Magnesium do? 

Here are a few, but not all:

Diabetes mellitus

Type 2: Hypomagnesaemia (low Mg) is present in about 25-38% of all diabetic patients. Oral supplementation over 4 months in addition to diabetic medication has produced reductions in fasting glucose and insulin. Several trails have investigated Mg supplementation and shown improvement in diabetic control. 

Magnesium can support (but not cure) diabetes and help regulate blood sugar control.

Hypertension:

Studies within populations suggest a link between blood pressure and Mg levels. Mg modulates vascular tone and reactivity both directly and non-directly with its work against calcium. Studies have shown modest but significant success in at risk individuals. 

Correct Magnesium levels may lead to lower blood pressure

Headaches and migraines: prevention

Patients who suffer from recurrent migraines appear to have lower intracellular (inside the cell) Mg levels than those who do not. Two separate studies using high dose Mg have found it to be useful in migraine sufferers, reducing frequency and number of days patients suffered from migraines. Effects where observed after week 9 in another trail, showing that at times, results take time. 

This may display that low Mg could lead to higher incidence of migraines. 

Chronic leg cramps:

One trail looked into the use of oral Mg in people with leg cramps. Trends where found towards fewer leg cramps with active treatment. Most people would know of Magnesium’s use in leg cramps, and science has brought some of this knowledge to light. 

Another application for Mgs use includes leg cramps.

Psychological:

Conditions that Mg supplementation has been beneficial includes: chronic fatigue syndrome, anxiety states, tension headaches and insomnia. Magnesium is also involved in the production of energy (or ATP) within your cells and can lift vitality, as well as reducing psychological tension. Working on a number of levels, Mental Wellbeing can be improved with correct levels of Magnesium.

In addition:

Magnesium is also helpful with ADHD, asthma and constipation. As mentioned earlier, it is involved in numerous reactions, and all these can all relate to clinical outcomes. There would not be enough room in this Blog to name them all.

Diet:

So do we need supplementation? It is worth mentioning that Australia’s soil is lower in Magnesium due to aggressive farming methods. If you are looking to increase your Magnesium intake, I suggest eating the following and organic would be best:

  • Legumes
  • Wholegrain cereal
  • Nuts
  • Dark leafy vegetables
  • Raw, dark Cocao (my favorite!) 
  • Seeds

I am of two beliefs, if you can get your intake from diet, wonderful. However, if you have a higher need of a particular mineral, than supplementation may be of benefit. This brings into question the form of supplementation, as not all supplements are created equal.

There are many forms of Magnesium, where they bond elemental form Mg to another compound. The best forms are: Chelate, Glyinate and Citrate, and a mix is usually best. Look to intake about 300mg elemental Mg per day if supplementation is needed. 

If you require a detailed assessment of your nutritional needs, enquire within our website to book an appointment with our fully qualified Naturopath.

Thank you for joining me in this journey into the world of remedies. Next month we will be looking at Echinacea as we go into the colder months. Does it work? And if so, how should we take it? 

See you then!

 Final:

Remedy of the Month: Magnesium

By Jeremy Brown

Naturopath & Educator

Advanced Diploma Naturopathy

Certificate IV in training and assessment

As part of this Blog I will be showcasing a new remedy each month. Some months I will write about vitamins or minerals, while other months I will write about herbal medicines.

The remedy of the month for April is magnesium. So what is magnesium & what is it good for?

The mineral magnesium (or Mg) is the fourth most abundant cation (charged particle) in the body and it has many important functions within your body. It is involved in over 300 essential enzymatic reactions and is necessary for many major bodily processes. Enzymes are proteins within your body that change one chemical to another, and magnesium is a major player in many of them. The spoke in the wheel that helps the car to move is one way to put it. Magnesium is also extremely important to make other fundamental minerals including calcium, potassium, and sodium to function properly. 

So magnesium is vital for everyday bodily function and wellbeing.

But what about specific clinical applications? Just what does magnesium do in an every day sense? Below are five health reasons you might use magnesium for. 

1. Diabetes Mellitus

Hypomagnesaemia (low magnesium) is present in about 25-38% of all Diabetic patients. Oral supplementation given over four months in addition to diabetic medication has produced reductions in fasting glucose levels and insulin use. Several trials have investigated magnesium supplementation and which have shown improvement in diabetic control.

Magnesium can support (but not cure) diabetes and help regulate blood sugar control

2. Hypertension

Studies within various populations suggest a link between blood pressure and magnesium levels. Magnesium modulates vascular tone (blood vessels) and reactivity both directly and non-directly with its work against calcium. Studies have shown modest but significant success for individuals at risk of hypertension.

Correct magnesium levels may lead to lower blood pressure

3. Prevention of Headaches and Migraines

Patients who suffer from recurrent migraines appear to have lower intracellular (inside the cell) magnesium levels than those who do not suffer migraines. Two separate studies using high dose magnesium have found it to be useful in migraine relief, reducing both the frequency and number of days patients suffered from migraines. Effects were observed after week nine in another trial, showing that at times, results take time.

Low magnesium could lead to higher incidence of migraines

4. Chronic Leg Cramps

Many people may have heard of using magnesium if they experience leg cramps as magnesium is a muscle relaxant. Scientific research into the use of oral magnesium in people experiencing leg cramps has shown a possible connection between fewer leg cramps and active magnesium treatment. 

Magnesium may help reduce leg cramps

5. Psychological

Magnesium supplementation has been shown to be beneficial for anxiety, stress, insomnia and even low energy (common in depression). Magnesium is involved in the production of energy (or ATP) within your cells and can lift vitality, as well as reducing psychological tension at the same time. Working on a number of levels, mental wellbeing can be improved in various ways with the correct levels of magnesium.

Magnesium in your Diet

So do we need supplementation? This is a good question. It is worth mentioning that Australia’s soil is lower in magnesium due to aggressive farming methods. If you are looking to increase your magnesium intake, I suggest eating the following and organic would be best:

·      Legumes

·      Wholegrain cereal

·      Nuts

·      Dark leafy vegetables

·      Raw, dark Cocao (my favourite!)

·      Seeds

 If you can get your intake from diet, wonderful. However, if you have a higher need of a particular mineral, then supplementation may be of great benefit. This brings into question the form of supplementation, as not all supplements are created equal.

There are many forms of magnesium, where they bond elemental form to another compound. The best forms are: Chelate, Glyinate and Citrate, and a mix is usually best. You want to intake about 300mg elemental magnesium per day if supplementation is needed.

If you require a detailed assessment of your nutritional needs, enquire through our website to book an appointment with our fully qualified Naturopath at Brown’s Wellbeing Centre. 

Click here to improve your health today 

Yours in health,

Jeremy Brown

| Naturopath | Educator | Writer | 

Supporting Evidence: 

Braun, L., & Cohen, M. (2010). Herbs & natural supplements. Sydney: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Hechtman, L. (2012). Clinical Naturopathic medicine. Sydney, Australia: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier Australia.

 *Please note that this advice is of a general nature and does not replace the instruction of your health care practitioner.

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