Thiamine – Vitamin B1

Thiamine – Vitamin B1

While many of my Blogs have focused on particular conditions, foods or patient outcomes, we are returning to delivering to you a focus on particular nutrients used in modern clinical nutrition and their use in the body.

This weeks vitamin is Thiamine: otherwise known as Vitamin B1.

Thiamine is used in various different actions including, carbohydrate and protein metabolism, production of DNA, nerve function and mental health. These actions and their application in the body will be looked in brief detail and the research behind this supplement will be discussed. 

Alcoholism

In alcoholism, there is a state of decreased intake, absorption and use of thiamine, leading to deficiency of Thiamine, and thus symptoms. These include fatigue, weakness, poor memory and sleep disturbance. It can also lead to Korsakoff’s psychosis, which involves loss of memory and changes in personality. It is also used in cases of alcohol withdrawal where it is given intravascular or intramuscular. 

Thiamine can be used in treatment of alcohol dependency or withdrawal, but is best under professional supervision 

Diabetes

Because of Thiamine’s essential role in carbohydrate metabolism, and the possibility of glucose toxicity due to secondary thiamine deficiency (due a condition leading to Thiamine deficiency), there is growing research in its use in Diabetes. Early research shows great therapeutic potential of this nutrient in diabetes, as many diabetes appear deficient in Thiamine due to increased kidney function and loss of Thiamine. 

Thiamine is places an important role in the breakdown of carbohydrate and proteins, early research shows it possible use in diabetes

Dysmenorrhoea (painful periods)

Medical reviews have brought to light Thiamine’s use in Dysmenorrhoea. Studies over 5 months in over 500 women procured a positive improvement in over 90% of their cycles, and even brought skepticism on the review due to the generous positive results. All the same, the results stand for themselves. 

Thiamine has shown impressive results in Dysmenorrhoea or painful periods, though the results are questioned

Fatigue

B vitamin groups are often taken by the public in efforts to boost energy and support the stress response. In one study, 10mg of thiamine significantly increased appetite, energy intake, body weight, general wellbeing and reduced fatigue.

Alzheimer’s dementia

In Alzheimer’s patients, it appears that increasing Thiamine status may also increase cognitive function. It appears that Thiamine’s role as an anti-oxidant,  its role in the energy pathways of the cell, may all play a role in supporting Alzheimer’s patients. Is worth noting that results have been mixed, and further research is needed. 

Thaimine, along with other B vitamins have an important application in the treatment of fatigue

Food sources:

Brewer’s yeast, lean meat, legumes are considered the richest sources of Thiamine

Supplements:

Oral supplements are non-toxic, but should be used with caution in patients with cancer.  Thiamine is best used along side a B complex in order to have maximise affect. 

As with many natural medicines, the applications are broad and far reaching. Speaking to a Naturopathic practitioner will maximise your health outcomes to help you reach your health goals.

Make an enquiry today. 

Final:

By Jeremy Brown

Naturopath & educator

Introduction to B1 – Thiamine

While many of my Blogs have focused on particular conditions, foods or patient outcomes, we are returning to delivering a focus on particular nutrients used in modern clinical nutrition and their use in the body.

 This weeks vitamin is Thiamine: otherwise known as Vitamin B1

Thiamine is has different actions including carbohydrate and protein metabolism, production of DNA, nerve function and mental health. These actions and their application in the body will be looked at in brief detail and the research behind this supplement will be discussed.

1) Alcoholism

In alcoholism, there is a state of decreased intake, absorption and use of thiamine, leading a to deficiency and thus symptoms. These include fatigue, weakness, poor memory and sleep disturbance. This can also lead to Korsakoff’s psychosis, which involves loss of memory and changes in personality. It is also used in cases of alcohol withdrawal were it is given intravascular or intramuscular.

Thiamine can be used in treatment of alcohol dependency or withdrawal, but is best used under professional supervision

2) Diabetes

Because of thiamine’s essential role in carbohydrate metabolism, and the possibility of glucose toxicity due to secondary thiamine deficiency, there is growing research in its use in diabetes. Early research shows great therapeutic potential of this nutrient in diabetes, as many diabetics appear deficient in Thiamine due to increased kidney function and loss thereof

Thiamine plays an important role in the breakdown of carbohydrate and proteins and early research shows its possible use in diabetes

3) Dysmenorrhoea (painful periods)

Medical reviews have brought to light Thiamine’s use in Dysmenorrhoea. Studies over 5 months in over 500 women produced a positive improvement in over 90% of their cycles. This even brought skepticism on the review due to the generous positive results. All the same, the results stand for themselves.

Thiamine has shown impressive results in Dysmenorrhoea, though the results are questioned

4) Fatigue

B vitamin groups are often taken by the public in efforts to boost energy and support the stress response. In one study, 10mg of thiamine significantly increased appetite, energy intake, body weight, general wellbeing and reduced fatigue.

Thiamine is effective is reducing fatigue and is best dosed at 10mg 

5) Alzheimer’s dementia

In Alzheimer’s patients, it appears that increasing Thiamine status may also increase cognitive function. It appears that Thiamine’s role as an anti-oxidant and its role in the energy pathways, may all suggest treatment in Alzheimer’s patients. Is worth noting that results have been mixed, and further research is still needed.

Thiamine, along with other B vitamins have an important application in the treatment of fatigue

Food sources

Brewer’s yeast, lean meat, legumes are all considered the richest sources of Thiamine.

Supplements

Oral supplements are non-toxic, but should be used with caution in patients with cancer.  Thiamine is best used along side a B complex in order to have full effect.

As with many natural medicines, the applications are broad and far reaching. Speaking to a Naturopathic practitioner will maximise your health outcomes to help you reach your health goals sooner.

Click here to improve your health today 

Yours in health,

Jeremy Brown

| Naturopath | Educator | Writer | 

Supporting Evidence: 

Braun, L., & Cohen, M. (2010). Herbs & natural supplements. Sydney: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier.

Hechtman, L. (2012). Clinical Naturopathic medicine. Sydney, Australia: Churchill Livingstone/Elsevier Australia.

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